Tuesday, October 28, 2008

Boo Bubbles

It is Halloween in the media center this week and thanks to Steve Spangler (I just love this guy!) we are making BOO Bubbles!




First I am reading a Halloween book - Halloween Night by Majorie Dennis Murray then I get into my "mad" scientists role and we make Boo Bubbles.




I bought this kit at Steve Spangler.com - watch the video and it will get you pumped to do this too.

I pour water into the Jar and ask the kids what it is (I am looking for a liquid as the answer).



Then I put on my gloves and grab a piece of dry ice and ask the kids what is it (I am looking for dry ice and a solid).




Now the fun begins - I drop it into the water and POOF - fog rolls out of the jar....oooh...ahhh






So I talk about the smoke being a gas and being carbon dioxide - then I make the bubbles, dipping the end of the plastic tube into dish detergent and then capping the top of the jar so that the gas fills the bubbles.




The BOO part of this is that with the bubbles filled with gas, they look like ghosts. The science part of this is talking about states of matter (Solid, gas, liquid).


And who doesn't like a little dry ice fun this time of year!

4 comments:

Mamacita (Mamacita) said...

My family loves Steve Spangler! Have you signed up for his Experiment of the Week yet? Getting that freebie in my inbox each week really made our summer fun. Oh, and I LOVE your pictures!

http://www.stevespanglerscience.com/experiment-of-the-week.html?source=blog

Steve said...

Steve Spangler is proud! Your students will never forget the day they created the biggest science mess of all time. The pictures of the kids in yellow coats with soda flying through the air are priceless... and the PVC Mentos drop was the best!

Keep up the great work.

--Steve Spangler

Alyssa Ray said...

Hi! I work with Steve and just wanted to say great job with the Boo Bubbles! It's so great to see educators making amazing moments for their students. You are a rock star!

Alyssa

MotherReader said...

Okay, that's one cool science lesson. I do a program for 4-6 year olds with science and stories and I'm thinking the dry ice thing may be coming on the agenda.